Friday, November 13, 2020

KEANAN DUFFTY ON THE NEW ROMANTICS



The New Romantic movement grew out of a time of social and economic challenge, but also a time of great joy. Joy to be young and to dream of an escape to a creative life. From 1979 to 1980, London’s Blitz nightclub was the breeding ground for soon-to-be-famous names like Sade, John Galliano, Steve Strange, Tracey Emin, and Boy George.

British GQ Editor-in-Chief Dylan Jones documents that halcyon moment in fashion, music and ‘designer’ culture in his new book “Sweet Dreams – The Story of the New Romantics.” In a series of interviews with the movers and shakers of the era, Jones chronicles the decade between the birth of punk and the global spectacle of Live Aid.

In 1980, I was a teen punk rocker (and David Bowie fanatic) and lived in the Northern English town of Doncaster. I performed with my band Sordid Details and sewed clothes on my mother’s Singer machine. I also nursed ambitions of studying fashion at Central Saint Martins in London. In the wake of Glam rock, the British punk movement began in 1975 and channeled the Rocky Horror Picture Show, Bob Fosse’s Cabaret, and Warhol’s Factory. 1977 was the most explosive year in British popular culture. Overnight, punks appeared on every UK street. Androgynous girls in striped mohair sweaters carried kettles as handbags, boys wore tight plastic trousers, ripped T-shirts, plastic sandals and dyed cropped hair. The cultural clicker changed the channel from Black & White to Technicolor. Anything seemed possible.

However, by 1980, Punk had become a caricature and we were ready for the Next Big Thing. In London’s Bowie/Roxy Music-fixated Blitz club, gender fluid fashion students and nightlife reprobates who were soon to be christened New Romantics. Where Punk had aspired to chaos, New Romantics dreamed of couture, albeit on a Salvation Army budget. I formed an electronic synth-twiddling group called Wonder Stories. We were a dandy band in frilly shirts and suede pixie boots. One member had actually visited the Blitz club, passed the style test enforced by the promoter Steve Strange and faced down the catty remarks and aerodynamic hairstyle of coat check (Boy) George O’Dowd. We were in our pomp and on a mission to avoid drab conformity, living like it was Studio 54 with thrift store chic and a cut-price Kraftwerk soundtrack. 

The New Romantic crowd contained a strange bunch of stylish misfits: Cossacks, Che Guevara look-alikes, fellas in nun’s habits and future characters from ‘Game of Thrones’ all fleeing suburban mundanity. The movement has been maligned as a shallow and meaningless and in some ways, it was, but that was the point. Rather than wallow in punk pessimism, Blitz Kids chose to focus on positivity, fashion, dance music and the joy of self-expression. Like many of these cultural moments, it was only a matter of time before it imploded. By Charles and Diana’s Royal wedding in May 1981, it was over. “Sweet Dreams – The Story of the New Romantics” tells the whole story.

Pictured (top): The Wonder Stories.

Keanan Duffty is an award-winning British fashion designer, musician, educator, and CFDA member. Duffty is the author of “Rebel Rebel Anti-Style” (Rizzoli/Universe, 2009).


Monday, November 2, 2020

Sweet Dreams - The Story of the New Romantics. by Dylan Jones

 New book charts groundbreaking rise of New Romantics


Jackie Mallon Thursday, 29 October 2020. Fashion United

Sweet Dreams, The Story of the New Romantics, a new book by Dylan Jones, Editor-in-Chief of British GQ, documents a phenomenal moment in fashion history. It charts the British culture explosion that happened in the ten years from 1975-1985 and, in particular, the rise––and fall––of the New Romantics. As a music and fashion movement, loosely known in the US as the Second British Invasion, it spawned globally renowned names including Sade, Spandau Ballet, Boy George, Eurythmics and Duran Duran, all of whom are interviewed within the book. Keanan Duffty who was also a central figure of that scene, and now teaches Fashion Management at Parsons, is pictured below next to singer Marc Almond (who was about to shoot to stardom with the global hit “Tainted Love.”) Interviewed for Jones’ book, Duffty, also pictured below wearing red, reflects on the experience of being a New Romantic, or Blitz Kid as the Londoners were named, with FashionUnited.

What in your opinion made the New Romantic period so special?

As Dylan Jones' wonderful new book highlights, the New Romantic movement has been savagely maligned as a shallow, self-obsessed, and meaningless youth cult. And in many ways, it was, and that was the point. Rather than wallow in the pessimism of post punk, Blitz Kids chose to focus on positivity, fun, fashion, dance music, and self-expression, though it was only a matter of time before it imploded. The whole New Romantic story is so entrepreneurial and aspirational, even though 1979-1981 in the UK, and in New York for that matter, were pretty challenging times for college graduates and those who were looking to create a better, artistic life. A bit like right now.




What brought about its demise?

Within a year, it was all over. The point was to fail magnificently, thereby creating the ultimate success. Here was a training ground for fashion designers, film makers, musicians, DJs promoters and also drug dealers. New Romantic clubs were a nightlife laboratory where like-minded souls could meet and make plans for their future. Club culture evolved from a series of small independent ‘one-nighters’ beginning 1979/1980 that created a model which exploded by the end of the 80s with Acid House, rave culture and the super clubs like Ministry of Sound.

How long did it take to get dressed in the morning and where did you find your clothes?

Putting a “look” together for a big night out took all week. Scouring vintage clothing shops, military surplus stores or making clothes from exotic but cheap fabrics was the only way to go. London stores like Vivienne Westwood’s World’s End, or PX in London’s Covent Garden, were expensive and even though there were shops in provincial towns like X Clothes in Leeds, it was beyond most people’s budget. In any case, making a look was much more creative. It would have been abhorrent to wear a “label.” The likes of Gucci, YSL or Chanel were for the blue-haired posh ladies of Knightsbridge. The New Romantic badge of honor was being creative and unique, a do-it-yourself aesthetic.

Viewed through a contemporary lens, the eccentricity of the looks can border on costume. Was society just more accepting back then or was the youth more adventurous?

I had to put up with howls of laughter and disapproving barbs from the neighbors every time I waited at the bus stop looking like Little Lord Fauntleroy in crushed velvet, make-up, and Cuban heeled winkle pickers. I didn’t care. Where Punk had aspired to chaos, New Romantics dreamed of couture. In my mind I was prowling a catwalk, not the village street. For the New Romantic movement every day seemed like a voyage in a parallel universe, an escape from the suburban gender stereotypes with a strange bunch of style misfits all fleeing the mundane: male nuns, Cossacks, Che Guevara lookalikes, blokes wearing wedding dresses.… It was all about creating a fantasy and dreaming our way out of suburbia.

Could a movement like the New Romantics happen today?

Subcultures were tribal in the 1970s and 80s and the gang you belonged to denoted the music you listened to, the clothes you wore, the places you went. That really died with the internet and social media. Today you have access to everything, all the time. During the 70s and 80s you had to searchfor everything; clubs, music, style and your “crowd." It was joyfully naïve. Anything seemed possible. We have come to an impasse and the vacuous nature of the contemporary celebrity era makes the New Romantics seem like giants. It is appalling to see the sheer lack of subversion and provocation, the hideous outfits on near naked celebrities at New York’s Met Ball. But I believe that every generation’s creative force is able to conjure the Sex, Subversion and Style that Malcom McLaren preached. My hope is that future underground cultures can happen globally today in, for example, Thailand, India, Shanghai, away from the media microscope, if that is possible. Then something can grow undisturbed, like a subculture petri dish.

The New Romantics championed gender nonconformity decades before the fashion industry finally embraced it. Why do you think its influence was so fleeting in that area?

We are taught to conform to established gender stereotypes by society, from a very young age. It can be hard to break away from that depending on where one grows up. The British writer Jon Savage coined the term “Gender Bender” in an article for The Face magazine about David Bowie who had blazed a trail for gender nonconformity in the 1970s during the Glam Rock period. New Romantics certainly embraced that stance and in the wake of Punk they were able to wear their androgyny in public, which had been more difficult earlier in the 70s. Simply put, there was safety in numbers. By 1982 global beauty and haircare companies were advertising make-up and hair dye for men. But corporations had missed the target and their campaigns looked dated and silly. Youth culture had moved on.

The movement centered around music, in particular London club the Blitz, leading some to make comparisons with the phenomenon of Studio 54 happening around the same time in NYC. The former was patronized by milliner Stephen Jones and a young John Galliano, the latter by Halston and Calvin Klein. Do you find the comparison accurate?

Studio 54 was so glamorous and unreachable and a celebrity’s status gained them access beyond the velvet rope, but the New Romantic clubs like the Blitz were cheap. The only currency for entry was style. New Romantics in their pomp were on a mission to avoid the drab conformity of their English towns and live like it was Studio 54, but with thrift store chic and cut-price sartorial style. When Stephen Jones, John Galliano, Sade and many others went to the Blitz they were poor and unknown. Calvin and Halston, by contrast, were hanging out at Studio 54 in the height of their fame. New Romantics acted like they were living the lifestyles of the rich and famous. They were willing themselves into their future destiny.

Fashion editor Jackie Mallon is also an educator and author of Silk for the Feed Dogs, a novel set in the international fashion industry.

Thursday, October 22, 2020

"Sweet Dreams-The Story of the New Romantics"

 


Sweet Dreams charts the British cultural explosion that happened in the ten years from 1975-1985 — the rise of the New Romantics. Growing out of the remnants of the post-punk period, the New Romantics introduced club culture, ska, electronica, and goth to the world. A music and fashion movement that spawned globally renowned names including Sade, Spandau Ballet, Boy George and Duran Duran, all of whom are interviewed. 

Wednesday, August 12, 2020

A Robin Williams Signed Photo and Pair of Keanan Duffty x Reebok Shoes (2003).

 

A Robin Williams Signed Photo and Pair of Keanan Duffty x Reebok Shoes (2003). 
Previously offered at a celebrity shoe auction, this lot perfectly captures the zany, yet tender personality of the late Robin Williams; it includes a black-and-white production still from "Mrs. Doubtfire" autographed "Walk on all my love/ Robin Williams" in black Sharpie, as well as a pair of colorful red-and-green camoflauge Reebok/Keanan Duffty sneakers, each signed "Robin Williams" in black felt pen on the outer midsole. (Please note the shoes show very light wear, with two light scuffs to the inner midsole of the left shoe.) 

Saturday, August 1, 2020

Junya Watanabe Man Spring 2021


Photographer: Keizo Kitajima 

Bankrupt Muji U.S.A. Closing California Stores

Muji will close its California stores but hopes one day to bring brick-and-mortar back to the state.

By  on July 31, 2020 Women's Wear Daily.


The Muji storefront on East 59th Street in Manhattan.  George Chinsee/WWD


Muji U.S.A., one of the many retail victims of COVID-19, will permanently close all seven of its stores in California as part of the company’s Chapter 11 restructuring.

The locations are in Los Angeles on the Third Street Promenade, Hollywood, Santa Anita, Stanford, San Jose, Santa Monica and San Francisco.

The Chapter 11 filing in Delaware by Muji U.S.A on July 20 does not impact the Japanese retailer’s operations in Canada, Japan, and elsewhere around the globe, the company said.

Muji plans to use the court-supervised Chapter 11 process “to navigate the impacts of COVID-19 on brick-and-mortar retail and to reposition the brand’s e-commerce business as customer behavior has shifted to online shopping as a result of the pandemic.”

Satoshi Okazaki, chief executive officer of Muji U.S.A. commented, “At Muji we are so thankful for our customers and the community who have supported our stores throughout the years. We are especially grateful to our California community. As we work through the restructuring process, we hope to someday bring brick-and-mortar Muji stores back to California, and look forward to serving our California customers online in the meantime.”

Muji is known for its clean Asian aesthetic, multifarious merchandising and moderate prices. The stores average around 8,000 square feet and sell everything from plants, stationery, refillable gel pens, mattresses and sheets, to skin care, cleaning systems, marshmallows, containers, cookies and curry, as well as men’s, women’s and kids wear, and sandals.

When the company filed for Chapter 11 restructuring, it said it would close “a small number of its brick-and-mortar stores” as it focuses more on its online offerings.

Prior to the coronavirus outbreak, Muji had ambitious expansion plans for the U.S., considering opening 100 locations in five years, as well as a hotel on the West Coast. The California closings leave about 12 Muji stores continuing to operate.

COVID-19 aside, Japanese retailers have a poor track record in America. Takashimaya, Mitsukoshi, Itokin and Isetan all came and went, and business at Uniqlo, Muji’s biggest competitor globally, has been tough in the U.S., outside of major urban areas.

However, Muji stores did seem to be gaining acceptance, with good traffic seen at its Fifth Avenue and Hudson Yards stores in Manhattan prior to the pandemic, possibly due to its relatively small reliance on the fickle fashion category and its inexpensive, home and gift-oriented assortment.